Posts tagged heart disease

The portion of the U.S. population with heart disease will grow larger and live longer with the condition during the coming decades, driving up healthcare spending, according to a Health Affairsstudy. 

The portion of the U.S. population with heart disease will grow larger and live longer with the condition during the coming decades, driving up healthcare spending, according to a Health Affairsstudy. 

A four-in-one pill cut blood pressure and cholesterol significantly in over-50s with no history of heart disease in a small British study, fuelling debate about the use of a so-called polypill to ward off heart attacks and strokes.

A four-in-one pill cut blood pressure and cholesterol significantly in over-50s with no history of heart disease in a small British study, fuelling debate about the use of a so-called polypill to ward off heart attacks and strokes.

IBM and Novartis announced the NCD  Challenge, a competition among a number of the world’s leading  universities designed to tap the inventiveness of students to find new  ways to address the rise of non-communicable diseases in both developing  and developed countries.

IBM and Novartis announced the NCD Challenge, a competition among a number of the world’s leading universities designed to tap the inventiveness of students to find new ways to address the rise of non-communicable diseases in both developing and developed countries.

Little exercise beats none in heart disease

Even a little physical activity performed on a regular basis may reduce the risk of heart disease. And the more exercise people do, the more benefit in reducing risk, a new study finds. Read more here

Too Much TV Leads to Diabetes, Death

Most Americans spend at least some portion of their day watching TV, but a new report published in the Journal of American Medical Association found that too much television was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and early death. For every two hours of TV watching, experts found that the risk of diabetes rose to 20 percent and the risk of heart disease rose 15 percent in an 8.5 and 10 year follow-up period.Read more here